Reuben's Home Inspection Blog

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My search for an out-of-state home inspector, part two: comparing inspection reports

In searching for a home inspector for out-of-state family members buying a home, I ended up comparing dozens of home inspector web sites, trying to separate the great home inspectors from the hacks.  It wasn't difficult to find qualified home inspectors, but finding someone who I thought was a great home inspector was much more difficult.   As I mentioned at the end of my blog about finding an out-of-state home inspector, it all came down to comparing sample home inspection reports.

Reading sample home inspection reports is the best way to compare home inspectors, short of actually attending the home inspection.

In my humble opinion, the best home inspection reports have several things in common, and these were the things that I looked for in a sample home inspection report while searching for an out-of-state inspector:

Photos - this is a no-brainer and doesn't need much explanation.  Good home inspection reports have photos.  This is a basic requirement for a good home inspection report that most home inspectors include today.  In a recent survey of ASHI home inspectors with 4,500 responses, over 84% of ASHI home inspectors include photos in their reports.

Easy to read - I don't want to have to look at a legend to figure out what the inspector is trying to say, and I especially wouldn't want my family members trying to figure that stuff out.  Home inspection reports should be easy to understand and shouldn't need someone with industry knowledge to interpret what the inspector is trying to say.

Customized - home inspection reports should contain three basic components when addressing an issue: what the issue is, why it's an issue (if not obvious), and what should be done.

For example, if a water heater had a pressure relief valve that was plugged off on the end, a great home inspection report might say

"The pressure relief valve discharge tube has a cap attached to the end, which will prevent the valve from functioning; this could cause the water heater to explode or turn in to a missile if the water heater malfunctioned.  Have the cap removed."

A weak inspection report might say

"Capped relief pipe needs repair"

Both of these descriptions address the defect, but the first description is obviously a far superior description, and lets the client know why this item needs repair.

Disclaimers kept to a minimum - I looked for inspection reports that were focused on helping my family members; not explaining away why they couldn't.  Many home inspection reports are filled with CYA verbiage that is focused on explaining away why the home inspector couldn't see this or why they couldn't inspect that.  This isn't helpful to the home buyer, and when there's too much of it, it starts to sound 'weaselly'.  I don't want to read through a huge list of stuff that wasn't  inspected.  That list belongs in the contract or the standards of practice.  If the roof was covered with snow, say it was covered with snow and not inspected.  The end.

Realistic recommendations - This one is huge.  Many home inspection reports are filled with recommendations for further testing and inspections to the point where it gets absurd.  Mold testing?  Asbestos testing?  Lead testing?  Sewer scans?  Plumbing inspections?  Electrical inspections?  When I see recommendations for all these other inspections, I get the feeling that the home inspector is only concerned about not getting sued; they're not nearly as concerned about providing a good service to my family members.

Confident reports - this point is a little harder to define, but it's really what sets asides the rookies from the experienced home inspectors.  Anyone with the most basic understanding of a house can observe an abnormality, call attention to it, and recommend repair or a second opinion.  With knowledge and experience comes the confidence to say that something isn't a problem.

Ownership  - This might be something that many home inspectors don't even consider when they write reports, but I got turned off reading inspection reports where the inspector clearly didn't take ownership of the comments and recommendations he or she was making.  For example, "It is recommended..." takes no ownership.  "I recommend" does.

That makes up most of the stuff that I looked for in a sample home inspection report when choosing a home inspector for out-of-state family members.  In the end, I found a home inspector who had all of these qualities in a sample report, and I weeded out a ridiculous amount of qualified home inspectors who didn't.

If you're shopping for a home inspector, be sure to read a sample report.

RELATED POSTS:

My search for an out-of-state home inspector

How to decide on a home inspector

Reuben Saltzman, Structure Tech Home Inspections

        

Comment balloon 31 commentsReuben Saltzman • January 03 2012 06:20AM

Comments

Reuben, great tips I read part one recommended it, thanks for part 2

Posted by David Popoff, Realtor®,SRS, Green ~ Fairfield County, Ct (DMK Real Estate ) over 6 years ago

I have to admit, I am of the "less is more" crowd.  While I am certain about explaining what it is I am referring to, my lawyer son says to be certain but vague.  Too much is an opening for a salvo.

And, on the other hand, I find the 95 page report, with 173 photos to be a bit choking.  There's a photo of a scorched receptacle and the comment, "There is a scorched receptacle in the living room under the window."  The comment seems quite enough for me.  The photo is eye garbage.

My report does cross reference into my book however, where there is a photograph of a scorched receptacle and an explanation of what that means.

I hear you though.  I had a heck of a time finding an inspector for my daughter in Orem, Utah.  For my son in Seattle, I had many recommendations!

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 6 years ago

Reuben: Readable reports are especially important for first time home buyers.  Not a fan of the legends and have taken inspectors off my list because of it. Reblogged

Posted by Anne M. Costello (Weidel Realtors) over 6 years ago

David - thanks!

Jay - If you did a poll of your customers, the overwhelming majority would prefer to read a detailed report with lots of photos.  You say the photo is eye garbage... but people LOVE photos!

Your son is giving you advice to protect your ass; not to protect your clients or to give them a better service.

Anne - absolutely.  Thank you for the re-blog!

Posted by Reuben Saltzman, Delivering the Unbiased Truth. (Structure Tech Home Inspections) over 6 years ago

I agree - people love photos on an inspection report. It clarifies alot of questions. Good luck in your search.

Posted by K.C. McLaughlin, Realtor, e-PRO, Homes for Sale - Cary, Raleigh NC (RE/MAX United) over 6 years ago

Yes, I have over 1000 in my book!  Of course my "lawyer" would want to protect my ass.  But I give my clients a great service too!

My report is exceptionally detailed!

Do you see a value of having a photo in the report AND a reference in the report to the page in my book that has a photo of the same thing?  I am covered both ways!  Ass and clients.  Not to mix the two up, you understand...

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 6 years ago

Reuben, are you being a little too critical? Does a piece of paper with comments on it make for a good inspector? I would think checking out references would provide a better gauge as to someone's qualifications. A well written report will say a lot, but not all home inspectors are eloquent writers. I don't totally disagree with you, the report should be a factor, but maybe not the decesion maker. Good point for discussion.

Posted by Michael Setunsky, Your Commercial Real Estate Link to Northern VA over 6 years ago

KC - they're worth a thousand words, right? ;)

Jay - Of course you give your clients a good service - I know that :).  

I think that having a photo of the actual defect at the house is far superior to having a photo of a similar (or even identical) defect that was taken somewhere else.  I also think that having photos incorporated in to the report makes for a report that is much easier to read.

Michael - I strongly believe that good communication skills are a key part of being a good home inspector.  A good home inspection report does not necessarily make for a good home inspector, but I believe there is a strong connection between a good report and a good inspector.

I understand that many home inspectors aren't eloquent writers, and I certainly don't consider myself to be one, but a very basic and undervalued ability of a home inspector is to put their findings in writing.  You'll notice that I never made mention of spelling or grammer; those are certainly 'bonuses', but they're also forgivable offenses.

If there were real estate agents in the area that I knew, I probably would have asked them.

Posted by Reuben Saltzman, Delivering the Unbiased Truth. (Structure Tech Home Inspections) over 6 years ago

Great followup for this little series. Glad to see that my report would likely pass your tests. Have a great new year.

Posted by Scott Seaton Jr. Bourbonnais Kankakee IL Home Inspector, The Home Inspector With a Heart! (SLS Home Inspections-Bradley Bourbonnais Kankakee Manteno) over 6 years ago

Hi Reuben. The Home Inspection Report quality is as important as the inspection itself. I think it is equally important that the buyers accompany and pay attention to the inspector during his/ her inspection. No matter how well written the report is, or how many pictures there are, seeing it first hand makes a world of difference.
Thanks for sharing this!
Bruce

 

Posted by Bruce Kunz, REALTOR®, Brick & Howell NJ Homes for Sale (C21 Solid Gold Realty, Brick, NJ, 732-920-2100) over 6 years ago

I have a lot to say about this post. First I totally agree with all the points you made. The inspection report is  one of best ways to gage an inspectors work. After all this is what the client gets at the end of the inspection. It is the record of the condition of the house at that span of time

I see so many sample reports where the comments are barely minimal, full of disclaimers and as you say the inspectors doesn't take ownership. With respect to that, the general consensus I have heard is that it is better to use "I" than "Its" as it is more defensible. 

As for being vague, I think that is a myth. The more detail the better I believe. Where you can get into trouble is if you over step the bounds of your knowledge or speculate without giving evidence for your "assumption". 

I think one of the biggest reason for poor reports may be inspectors just wanting to get it done fast. Nothing makes my heart sink faster than a train wreck of a home. I know I am going to be writing a loooooonnnng report. No one likes to have to work a long time, but you have to do, what you have to do.

With regard to Michael's comment (#7), I recently had a person want references. They didn't seem at all interested in viewing my sample report, just those references. Well let's face it I sent them names of people who loved me. As would any other inspector or business owner. I am not saying references are useless, but they are without checking the companies work too. 

Okay I think I'm done :)

Posted by James Quarello, Connecticut Home Inspector (JRV Home Inspection Services, LLC) over 6 years ago

Great post, Reuben and some great comments, too!  At lot of my business comes from people finding my sample report on-line.  I agree with Jay in the way you don't want to have pictures just for the sake of having pictures and end up with 100+ pages.  If the picture clearly supports a defect I'm writing about, I'll include it.  And like James says, a lot of these inspectors just want to hurry up and get the report over with and they don't put in the time the client deserves.  Some of the homes I see are super time-consuming train wrecks, but short-changing a client would be bad business!

Posted by David Artigliere, ARTI Home Inspections, ASHI Certified Home Inspect (Reading, Pottstown, Norristown, Philadelphia) over 6 years ago
Rueben, I will look at home inspections in a completely different light now. Based on your list, no wonder I keep using the same home inspector. He avoided your lisred pitfalls, and does all of the "shoulds"'
Posted by Karen Crowson, Your Agent for Change (Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage) over 6 years ago

A new perspective on how you look at fellow inspectors reports is very interesting.  I would agree that some items in the report like pictures any potential owner is going to find very useful. 

Posted by Morgan Evans, LICENSED REAL ESTATE SALESPERSON (Douglas Elliman Real Estate) over 6 years ago

Great post Reuben. I do agree with your slant on things and reviewing the reports is the best you can do for finding that 'great' inspector. However you will miss the on site communication and service that great inspectors also provide.

I take my customers on a tour through the building and show and explain what I'm finding along the way and answering any and all questions. At the end I sit and review the photos with them (and the others present, owners, sellers, agents,etc.).

I then either write the report or prece the outline (if I'm emailing it later) and I read and explain the report and answer questions. If there are things that need to be looked at , we can do that before we leave the house. I also show them how to find and retrieve specific details of the report, with out having to plow through the whole thing.

My on-site report is a 400 page binder format with a wealth of reference and support material. And I show them how to access and use that.

My email reports provide links to the same reference and support material and site photos and diagrams are included.

In both cases the client gets an email link 1; to view all the inspection photos and 2; to download all the inspection photos in one operation.

At the end my clients not only get a report but they have had a half day seminar on that home, that building type and the systems in it.

 The last thing I do is make sure they have my contact information and remind them that even though the inspection itself is over, they are my client and can contact me with questions or for clarifications by phone or email , at any time.

 

Does that make me a 'great' inspector? ..I don't know, that's not for me to say. But I do my best to serve them well. I have gotten repeat business from many and frequently other parties (usually the sellers and their agents) are asking for my card before I leave.

 

Posted by Robert Butler, Montreal Home Inspector | Aspect Inspection (Aspect Inspection) over 6 years ago

First, for the record, in 10 years of selling I can count on one hand the number of times a buyer hasn't had an inspection and I've had to have a waiver signed. Heck, I even make sellers get pre-listing inspections. So I am a firm advocate on the importance of professional home inspections.

My single biggest issue with any home inspection report -- the actual document given to the client -- is that it doesn't match up with our contract. Our purchase contract says that inspection is designed to address material defects and major threats to health and safety. It also says "the fact that an item is at the end of it's useful life is not a basis for terminating the contract". So a home inspection report with dozens of tick marks  that say "recommend inspection by licensed..." etc, etc, are a huge problem. We're an attorney state, and so we almost always enter an entire 2nd round of negotiation on inspection issue.

My buyers are well educated on this ahead of time on what material defect and major health and safety means. But too many agents and attorney see a 200 item inspection report as 2nd round to negotiate a sizable reduction in the price. 

Furthermore, lots of trades aren't licensed in IL, or they are licensed on a town by town basis. HVAC and roofers are licensed by state law, electrical is not in many jurisdictions. It's crazy. And Chicago city regs are way different from the other 150 jurisdictions in northern IL. Perhaps the worst is all the issues over basements: a crack in a foundation wall could need a water-proofer or a structural engineer. 

So I wish the inspection report did a better job of separating the contract issues from the "educate and advise the buyer" issues. My favorite inspectors do this in a good summary on top of what ever report they use, and I wish that more went to this extra step.

Posted by Leslie Ebersole, I help brokers build businesses they love. (Swanepoel T3 Group) over 6 years ago

Reuben, I just could not agree more with your post or with Jim's comment so I am just going to repeat what Jim said:

"The inspection report is  one of best ways to gage an inspectors work. After all this is what the client gets at the end of the inspection. It is the record of the condition of the house at that span of time. 

 

I see so many sample reports where the comments are barely minimal, full of disclaimers and as you say the inspectors doesn't take ownership. With respect to that, the general consensus I have heard is that it is better to use "I" than "Its" as it is more defensible. 

 

As for being vague, I think that is a myth. The more detail the better I believe. Where you can get into trouble is if you over step the bounds of your knowledge or speculate without giving evidence for your "assumption". 

 

I think one of the biggest reason for poor reports may be inspectors just wanting to get it done fast. Nothing makes my heart sink faster than a train wreck of a home. I know I am going to be writing a loooooonnnng report. No one likes to have to work a long time, but you have to do, what you have to do."

 

Posted by Charles Buell, Seattle Home Inspector (Charles Buell Inspections Inc.) over 6 years ago

Scott - thanks, and I'll take your word for it :).  I tried viewing a sample report on your web site, but I received an error message.  Does it work for you?

Bruce - I agree, it's definitely a good thing for buyers to attend the inspection.  I always encourage my clients to attend the entire thing, whenever possible.

James- thanks.  We ought to come up with a post about home inspector myths.

Boy do I hear you when you talk about your heart sinking when you pull up to a house with a lot of... needs.  My first inspection for this year was a 2,500 sf house that took me 4 1/2 hours to inspect, and I spent another 4 hours at home typing up the report.  I'm not bragging, I'm complaining.  Those buyers got a good deal on the inspection.  It really makes me wish I was charging by the hour.

I have the exact same take on referrals; if someone asks me for referrals, I give 'em past clients that think I walk on water ;-) .  I think that even the worst inspectors in this industry could provide names of people who would give them glowing reviews.

Posted by Reuben Saltzman, Delivering the Unbiased Truth. (Structure Tech Home Inspections) over 6 years ago

David- Ditto.  I've had countless transactions where I inspected the house, the sellers saw my inspection report, and said "we're hiring that guy."  I've seen some reports that go overboard with photos, but I've seen far more that could have used more photos.  I know I already said it, but I'll say it again: buyers love photos.

Karen - it sounds like you have a winner you'll be sticking with.  Good to hear :)

Morgan - thanks.  Even if the photos don't turn out to be useful, people appreciate them.

Posted by Reuben Saltzman, Delivering the Unbiased Truth. (Structure Tech Home Inspections) over 6 years ago

Robert- You're right, attending an inspection is really the best way to gauge a home inspector, hands down... but it's a tough way to shop :)

It sounds like you have a great approach to your inspections, and from the conversations we've had, I have no doubt that you're a great inspector.  

Leslie - I've heard you mention this same topic before, and this certainly does sound like an issue in your area.  If I were in your shoes, I'd get frustrated too.  

Thankfully, we don't have any such regulations or restrictions in my area, so I've never had any complaints like that.  I hope it stays that way.

Charles - wow, well put!

Posted by Reuben Saltzman, Delivering the Unbiased Truth. (Structure Tech Home Inspections) over 6 years ago

Reuben,

This was fun to read with all the comments. I agree with you on the report also. I have seen so many reports that are not worth the paper they are printed on. They contain so little information and are so vague you really do not know what they are talking about.

In my reports I also produce several summaries that I think help everyone sift through the inspection report.

This does make me think I should update my sample report though. I have changed it quite a bit over time.

Posted by Donald Hester, NCW Home Inspections, LLC (NCW Home Inspections, LLC) over 6 years ago

Thanks Donald.  I've resolved to change my sample report every year; the stuff I put in my reports seems to change so much from year to year, I have to.

Posted by Reuben Saltzman, Delivering the Unbiased Truth. (Structure Tech Home Inspections) over 6 years ago

Reuben -- thank you for your service to the community by putting together this report for us to better understand what we should get, and how to determine who is likely to provide it for us.

Posted by Steven Cook (No Longer Processing Mortgages.) over 6 years ago

I agree - you are spot on in evaluating inspection reports, but not judging an out of town inspector. Anyone can buy excellent standardized reporting systems. What else do you know about an out of town inspector? Being a member of a professional home inspection organization is advisable, but it doesn’t make you a great inspector. In my opinion the company structure tells you a lot about a home inspector. There are four home inspection structures: single operator, single operator franchise, multi-inspector franchise and multi-inspector independent company.  What do you know about a single operator? Nothing - or whatever you choose to believe on their website. Also, they either: haven’t been in business long enough, aren’t popular enough or choose not to expand – they are either inexperienced, unpopular or a technician not a business person. How about a single operator franchise? Although the franchises claim there franchisees are chosen from the most qualified applicants, we all know anyone with the fee is qualified. But the franchisee has had some form of training, has a standardized proven system set up for him and has access to a network of other inspectors. Even though the franchise inspector operates within a proven system there isn’t a lot of close supervision. It’s more the inspector asking for help when needed. But with everything set up for him, why isn’t he more popular?  I wouldn’t recommend either of these first two types of inspectors. The single operator inspectors claim to be full time. But they can’t be full time and do all the marketing, administrative and accounting required to run a small business. The multi-inspector firms have an advantage, although the independent company doesn’t need the crutch of the franchise. In a multi-inspector firm the principle inspector probably isn’t doing too many inspections. But the other inspectors are doing nothing but inspections. In a multi-inspector firm the inspectors go through a selection process to determine if they have the right personality, previous experience, communication skills, social habits, criminal record,  etc. to be a great inspector. Then they go through a training program until the primary inspector knows they are ready to inspect on their own. A dirty little secret in the home inspection industry is that new single operator inspectors get their experience from their first clients. There are no apprenticeships I know of. After the training period the new inspector is closely supervised to make sure he knows and is following proven policies and procedures. In every situation the new inspector has been trained how to handle it.  In a multi-inspector company there is in-house on-going training on not only the technical aspect of the job but also customer service and communication skills. Sorry I didn't see part 1, but, if I was asked to refer an out of town inspector, I’d look at more than just their report.

Posted by Jack Moriarty over 6 years ago

Steven - thanks for reading!

Jack - that's a mouthful.  You say that anyone can buy excellent standardized reporting systems... but an excellent standardized reporting system does not equate to an excellent report.  In fact, it often leads to lazy report writing.  

As for evaluating the type of company, you bring up an interesting point about multi-inspector companies, but personally I wouldn't put much weight in that.  I'm part of a multi-inspector company, so I say this completely without bias.  There is one multi-inspector company in my area that probably does some of the worst inspections in town... 

Posted by Reuben Saltzman, Delivering the Unbiased Truth. (Structure Tech Home Inspections) over 6 years ago

@ Jack, Wow! I see your company fits the "perfect" home inspection company you describe. FYI in Connecticut, there is a process by which an inspector must be trained. I do admit it is far from perfect, but by your account nothing exists at all anywhere. I'm a single operator always have been always will be. By your definition I'm an inferior inspector. You see it's MY business, which means I can run it my way. Not the way someone thinks it SHOULD be run. Everyone is different. 

I also noticed that your web does not have a sample report. Sure anyone can buy a good template. The thing is all good computerized systems are customizable. More importantly when looking at a sample report, as Reuben as told us, one can get an idea of the inspectors knowledge and reporting skills. Let's face there are some individuals that can not put sentences together. 

Posted by James Quarello, Connecticut Home Inspector (JRV Home Inspection Services, LLC) over 6 years ago
James,
I'm sorry if I offended you. I was speaking in generalities. There are many, many excellent single operator inspectors. I know who they are in my region. Don't you know who the good and not so good inspectors are in your region? But do you know who is good in my region? I interviewed a guy one time and he looked good, until I did a criminal back ground check on him. He is a two time convicted felon. He now is a practicing home inspector in my region. He is smart, good looking, educated, has great communication skills, has a professional reporting system, writes a great report, has a super web site but he is dishonest. No one knows, or can tell he is a crook - except me.
I did state "to my knowledge" there is no apprentice program for home inspector. I went through a four year  trades apprentice program years ago. The first six months was eight hours a day of class room training. If you failed the weekly test two weeks in a row you lost your job. After that I worked (on-the-job training) in every shop in the facility. We had 4 hours of trade theory class room training every week. Every fifth week we had academic training - English, math, physics, trade drawing and operations & management. If you failed the academic training two consecutive months you lost your job. Is the training in Connecticut anything like that. The last inspector I hired had 14 years in the trades, he completed ASHI at Home and did over 400 training inspections before I let him do his first inspection on his own. He is now my best inspector - but I still review his reports. By the way, I've had two inspectors who were ASHI technical committee chairmen.
My website actually does have a sample report - it's just hard to find. That's my fault. I'm getting lazy in my marketing in my old age.
The point I was making was single operator inspectors are self appointed, no one knows what training they have and operate completely unsupervised. They may or may not be great inspectors. How is one to know? Am I wrong?
Jack
Posted by Jack Moriarty over 6 years ago

@ Jack, Sorry to get a little irked, no offense taken. How do you know this inspector is "dishonest". A convicted felon yes, but dishonest?  As for the state requirements, we do not have an apprenticeship program for contractors in CT. The state does have a licensing requirement for home inspectors which does have an internship period (100 inspections). Like I said not perfect, but it is something.

I understand your point as does Reuben, which is why he wrote these two blogs. It is hard to know who is good outside of your own area. Looking at a sample report along with interviewing the inspector is a good way to get an idea of their competency. 

Posted by James Quarello, Connecticut Home Inspector (JRV Home Inspection Services, LLC) over 6 years ago

Hi Jack,  I found the sample inspection report on your web site - http://www.ins-pect.com/files/SampleReport.pdf .  

As James said, the point of these two blogs was to share the stuff that I looked for when looking for a good home inspector.  The size of the company didn't factor in to the equation at all.  There are plenty of great home inspectors out there, and the majority of them are one-man shops.  

I see you have Kenny Hart on your team, so that would be enough proof for me to think you guys do good work, but if I didn't know anything else about your company, your report wouldn't sell me.  Take my example above of a capped off relief valve on a water heater, and compare that to the language you have in your sample report.  Do you really believe that this condition needs 'further evaluation?'  

I sat through a training seminar that Kenny gave less than a week ago (which was great), and he asked the class about a similar situation - does it need 'further evaluation?'  No.  It just needs repair.  You're making unrealistic recommendations in your report.  

Sorry, I'm getting a little off topic and it sounds like I'm trying to attack your report; that's not my point. My point is that I don't think the size of the company should be a factor.

Posted by Reuben Saltzman, Delivering the Unbiased Truth. (Structure Tech Home Inspections) over 6 years ago

Reuben, As I already stated I agreed with all your points above. Further evaluation is an "out" used too often I think. I'm not saying I don't use it, but I try to do so sparingly and when I feel it's something way out of my scope of knowledge, expertise. 

Posted by James Quarello, Connecticut Home Inspector (JRV Home Inspection Services, LLC) over 6 years ago

James,

It is hard to be more dishonet than an embezzler. But, I also had a murderer apply. He said he had done his time (bar fight).  I didn't hire him either.

We don't require an apprenticeship for contractors in my state. This was a Federal job you not only had to pass a test to qualify for, but then you had to compete with everyone else who passed for the limited vacancies. In my state the requirement to be a nail technician are more stringent than those to be a home inspector.

Reuben,

Every company runs a little different. If you are in a highly litigious state you might report your findings different. I'm always on my guys about over using the term "evaluate and correct". But in the case of a capped TPR valve, that term is appropriate. Obviously whoever was working on this system was incompetent. The "qualified plumbing contractor" who repairs this major safety problem should check out the entire system for other subtle problems a "generalist" wouldn't observe. Notice I didn't use the word "miss". Home inspectors either observe or do not observe base on their experience and knowledge. Miss would imply negligence. If the inspector follows the standard he inspects to he shouldn't be expected to be as knowledgable as a specialist. If your family doctor detects a problem during a routine physical he refers you to a specialist. He doesn't schedule the operation. Not the best example, but you get the general concept.

Everyone enjoys Kenny's presentation. What you see is what you get. He is an authentic person. I am the little, old guy you say him hanging out with at the conference. But everyone is little compared to Kenny. He tells me, "all you multi-inspector guys think the single operators are poor businessmen and all the single operators think you guys are lousy inspectors". We need to get over it and work together to improve the industry overall.  To quote Rodney King, "can't we all just get along".

Posted by Jack Moriarty over 6 years ago

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